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    Table of Contents

    New Ways to Clean Up Water and Use it Again

    In 2006, farmers in North and South Carolina earned some $10 billion from crops and livestock, but it wasn’t easy money. Like elsewhere in the country, livestock and crop producers in this region struggle with managing agricultural pollutants that can affect the quality of surface water and groundwater.

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    Spotlight on Bluetongue Virus

    Bluetongue virus (BTV) infection only rarely results in the swollen, bluish mouth tissue for which it was named, but its other symptoms—such as fever, swelling, and salivation—can cause significant discomfort for the animals it affects. The virus targets ruminants such as cattle, sheep, goats and deer. Sheep are particularly susceptible to BTV and may have mortality rates above 10 percent.

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    High School Student Makes His Own Fue

    In a time of $4 per gallon diesel fuel, Christian Wyler has skills that could make oil executives shudder. For the past four years, the Garrard County High School senior has been making biodiesel in his own back yard. The fuel that Wyler makes now goes into the diesel engines of his father's Volkswagen Jetta, as well as much of the equipment on his grandfather's Lincoln County farm. Strange coincidence, curiosity and the price at the pump led Wyler to start up his operation.

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    Farm of the Future Project

    Farming Biodiesel Inc. Farm of the Future is Open Projected to Produce 15,000,000 Gallons of Biodiesel a Year by 2010 Farming Biodiesel Inc a 1500 Acre Self Sufficient Jatropha Farm in the Californian Desert is now planting biodiesel fuel stock using various farming methods to produce biodiesel.

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    Immigration Policy Hurts US Farming Industry

    The American farmer is an essential part of America's history and future. What many of us don't often think about is the fact that behind every American farmer and harvest is a community of immigrants who perform the arduous labor that is required to pull, pick and prepare that harvest for our use and enjoyment.

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    FDA Food Protection Plan Shows Significant Pr

    "The Food Protection Plan is the comprehensive framework the agency needs to enhance the protection of our nation's food supply," said Commissioner of Food and Drugs Andrew C. von Eschenbach, M.D. "Implementing the strategic approaches outlined in the plan is essential if we are to enhance our ability to respond and intervene in foodborne outbreaks. But there is much more that needs to be done. We are hopeful that Congress will support these efforts by providing the proposed new authorities that we requested in the Food Protection Plan."

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    Trade Shows

    When it comes to deciding if tradeshows can be an effective marketing tool for your company or business, a careful analysis of the landscape and return on investment potential is in order. To be or not to be, that is the question. Where? On the tradeshow floor of course. If the results of your analysis prove that the benefits of investing in tradeshows are worthwhile, the first thing you want to do is decide what show you want to exhibit in and sign up for the show. The sooner you do the better your booth location could be. You know what they say about location, location, location.

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    As Food Prices Rise

    With food and fuel prices increasing sharply, food and nutrition directors in school districts around the country are finding themselves facing some uncomfortable choices.

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    U.S. CLIMATE CHANGE

    WASHINGTON, May 27, 2008 -- The U.S. Climate Change Science Program (CCSP) today released "Synthesis and Assessment Product 4.3 (SAP 4.3): The Effects of Climate Change on Agriculture, Land Resources, Water Resources, and Biodiversity in the United States." The CCSP integrates the federal research efforts of 13 agencies on climate and global change. Today's report is one of the most extensive examinations of climate impacts on U.S. ecosystems. USDA is the lead agency for this report and coordinated its production as part of its commitment to CCSP. "The report issued today provides practical information that will help land owners and resource managers make better decisions to address the risks of climate change," said Agriculture Chief Economist Joe Glauber.

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    OIE CONSISTENT TRADE STANDARDS FOR CATTLE

    WASHINGTON, March 27, 2008-Officials from the United States, Canada and Mexico concluded a series of meetings today that provided all three countries an opportunity to discuss issues of mutual concern affecting agriculture, food and trade. Today, Agriculture Secretary Ed Schafer and Canadian Minister of Agriculture and Agri-Food Gerry Ritz held the first meeting between the countries since full implementation of the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) on Jan. 1, 2008. And, the United States, Canada and Mexico announced protocols, effective tomorrow, to harmonize standards for the export of U.S. and Canadian breeding cattle to Mexico consistent with international standards.

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    USDA Leads Efforts to Lessen Greenhouse Gases

    Responding to President Bush's call for governments around the world to accelerate the development of renewable energy and reduce greenhouse gas emissions, Agriculture Secretary Ed Schafer announced USDA's wide-ranging initiative at the Washington International Energy Conference.

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    Enterprise Rent-A-Car, VeraSun Energy join

    The Sioux Falls location is the newest Enterprise branch to receive the E85/FlexFuel designation as part of a nationwide effort to promote the expanded availability and use of E85, a blend of 85 percent ethanol and 15 percent gasoline. Enterprise will commit to fueling its Sioux Falls FlexFuel vehicles with VeraSun's branded E85, VE85(TM).

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    Administration Analysis Details Impact on

    Feb 29, 2008 – At the request of senior House and Senate agriculture committee staff, the U.S. Department of Agriculture today provided a detailed document developed from Administration analysis of impacts to current USDA programs - in the absence of enactment of a new farm bill or an extension of the 2002 farm bill past March 15, 2008.

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    CSREES Participates in America Saves Week

    February 21, 2008 During America Saves Week, February 24 through March 1, Americans will be encouraged to assess their savings and participate in activities focused on savings needs, including debt repayment, emergency savings, homeownership, education and retirement. USDA's Cooperative State Research, Education and Extension Service (CSREES) is a partner in this activity.

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    Market to People Surfing At Work

    In the early days of the World Wide Web, almost all activity took place at night. In fact, the Web didn't really heat up until after the nightly TV news had gone to bed.

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    Cattlemen Seek Checkoff Changes

    Cattle producers in Nebraska and other states are pushing for the first significant change to the national beef checkoff program since it started more than 20 years ago. The beef checkoff program is behind the popular "Beef, It's What's for Dinner" ads that feature the distinctive voice of actor Sam Elliott. At a dollar a head, the checkoff fee pools about $80 million annually for beef promotion, research and education, among other things.

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    US Farms Decline in 2007 to 2.08 million

    The American landscape is dotted with fewer farms as a result of consolidation and a movement of land to nonagricultural uses, the government said on Friday. U.S. farm operations are estimated at 2.08 million at the start of this year, a decline of 0.6 percent, from 2.09 million one year ago, the Agriculture Department said.

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    USDA Urges New User Fees

    WASHINGTON (Reuters) - In the wake of several high-profile food recalls, the White House on Monday proposed two new user fees that would provide $96 million to help pay for additional meat inspections. The Bush administration proposed in its fiscal 2009 budget one plan that would generate $92 million through a licensing fee that all meat plants would pay based on production levels. An additional $4 million would be collected from plants that require additional testing, have recalls or inspections linked to an outbreak of food-borne illnesses.

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    What's the Hottest Farm Commodity? Land

    Rick Rohrich, a 26-year-old father of three, just bought his first farmstead at a time when crop and pasture land are fetching record prices. He didn't think he had a choice. Rural land prices are setting records across the country, and farmers, with a boost from high commodity prices, are in a buying mood. "The prices keep jacking up and I don't see it slowing down," Rohrich said.

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    Sweden to Study Belching Cows

    A Swedish university has received $590,000 in research funds to measure the greenhouse gases released when cows belch.

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    Purdue Students Sniff Manure for Science

    January 2, 2008 Purdue University students are making some extra cash through a project that might turn some of their classmates' stomachs — by sniffing livestock excrement. Students earn $30 per session as they take whiffs of a variety of smells collected from barns filled with hogs, cows and chickens for odor research being conducted by Albert Heber, a Purdue professor of agricultural and biological engineering.

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    Farm Bill Passes Senate

    The Senate on Friday approved a $286 billion farm bill with an election-year expansion of subsidies for growers and food stamps for the poor. The bill, passed on a 79-14 vote, expands subsidies for wheat, barley, oat, soybeans and several other crops and creates new grants for vegetable and fruit growers. It also increases loan rates for sugar producers, extends dairy programs and provides more dollars for renewable energy and conservation programs to protect environmentally sensitive farmland over the next five years.

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    New Results Available From Variety Testing Pr

    URBANA--The University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign has released the 2007 results from its variety testing program for corn and soybeans. The data from these latest trials are available in both printed form and on the Internet at http://vt.cropsci.uiuc.edu/. "One of the most important production decisions facing producers each year is which soybean variety or corn hybrid to grow on their farm," said Emerson Nafziger, U of I Extension agronomist. "The variety testing program in the Department of Crop Sciences at the U of I provides accurate and unbiased performance data on a large number of soybean varieties and corn hybrids so that growers can make the best choice possible on what to plant."

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    Statement by Acting Secretary Chuck Conner

    "I believe Congress has a responsibility to deliver a new farm bill. The Administration unveiled our comprehensive farm bill proposal nearly 11 months ago for the very purpose of delivering a new farm bill before farmers faced difficult decisions due to uncertainty about future farm policy. Farmers themselves asked us to fix the current farm bill, which pays them the most in their best years and offers little or no support when they really need it due to crop loss. Failure to pass a new farm bill would continue a defective safety net.

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    PHILIPPINES ALLOWS FULL MARKET ACCESS FOR U.S

    WASHINGTON, Nov. 16, 2007—Acting Agriculture Secretary Chuck Conner today announced that the Philippines has fully complied with international trade standards regarding beef and beef products by allowing complete market access for U.S. beef and beef products of all ages. "I applaud Philippine Agriculture Secretary Arthur Yap for making a decision that is based on sound science and in line with international guidelines," Conner said. "The Philippines has set the standard for other Asian nations, and we will continue to press for full market access throughout the Pacific Rim."

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    Congress Debating Legislation

    Do you know which multi-billion dollar bill Congress must pass every five years to fund conservation, renewable energy programs, nutrition and food stamp programs as well as subsidies for row crops like corn and farmland protection? It's the Farm Bill, and it affects virtually every American's access to healthier food and local foods, cleaner water, fresher air and open spaces by reducing sprawl. Polls show that voters want Congress to reform this historically pork-laden legislation. Yet, the U.S. House of Representatives recently passed a five-year, $286 billion Farm Bill that failed to meet any reasonable standards of reform or equity.

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    Organic rice grower reaps what it sows

    For someone who grew up surrounded by farmland in landlocked Lancaster County, PA, it's strange to see "beach birds" at Lundberg Family Farms in California's Sacramento Valley. Snowy white egrets and great blue herons pick through the rice paddies around me, seeking insects and grains. Jet-black ibis float in the irrigation channel. They're among the 200 kinds of birds, including cranes, ducks and swans, that rest and lay eggs in the organic rice fields before they continue to migrate.

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    Introduction to Farm Machinery

    Farm machinery has changed the very nature of farming. The types and functions of farm machinery have been evolving since the first human gave up hunting and turned to the soil. When our early ancestors gave up the hunting and gathering lifestyle and turned to growing food from the soil, they most likely did so with no help from tools. At the most, they used sticks and their bare hands. When they developed crude plows and scythes, these tools dominated farming for centuries.

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    What is The Difference Between a Worm, Virus

    Most of us don't make a real difference between worm, virus and Trajan Horse or refer to a worm or Trajan Horse as a virus. All of us know all are malicious programs that can cause very serious damage to PC. Exist differences among the three, and knowing those differences can help you to better protect your computer from their often damaging effects.

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    Higher Corn Prices?

    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. — Expectations of higher corn prices are leading some farmers to neglect or ignore integrated pest management strategies, and their behavior could undermine the very technologies that sustain them, University of Illinois researchers report today at the American Chemical Society meeting in Boston.

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    USDA Begins Issuing CRP Payments

    Acting Agriculture Secretary Chuck Conner announced that beginning today; USDA will distribute approximately $1.8 billion in Conservation Reserve Program (CRP) rental payments to participants across the country for fiscal year 2008 for completed performance in the prior fiscal year.

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    U.S. Agricultural Exports

    WASHINGTON, Aug. 31, 2007 – Agriculture Secretary Mike Johanns today announced a record $79 billion forecast in FY 2007 agricultural exports. For fiscal year 2008, USDA forecasts exports to reach $83.5 billion with growth and new sales across all major agricultural product groups.

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    Big Bucks for Small Landowners?

    I know many of you are probably like my family and me; you would like an opportunity to shoot a buck with quality or trophy antlers. Also, like us, the property you deer hunt on is probably less than 1,000 acres in size, and many are probably less than 500 acres. You also probably have many neighbors with properties less than 500 acres who allow family and friends to deer hunt, many of whom want to and will shoot any buck if given the chance.

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    New Plant Image Gallery Search Engine Makes P

    The Plant Image Gallery contains numerous images of each plant species for your ease in their identification. Most grasses represented have been photographed in their entirety during their reproductive phase along with close-ups of the inflorescences, spikelets and other identifiable vegetative characteristics. Most forbs have also been photographed in their entirety during flowering along with close-ups of the flowers, fruits, stems and leaves. The woody plants represented have been photographed in their entirety as well, but not necessarily during their flowering or fruiting periods. We have focused more on close-ups of their leaves for use in identification, but have included numerous close-ups of flowers and fruits as well.

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    Artificial Insemination Can Work for Commerci

    Artificial insemination (AI) is one of the most effective tools available to enhance the productivity and profitability of beef cattle production systems. Even though this tool has been commercially available for more than 65 years, it is still dramatically underused in today's beef herds. Less than 5 percent of the nation's beef cows are bred using AI, with the majority of these breedings taking place in the seedstock and club calf sectors.

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    Even With High Nitrogen Prices, Proper Fertil

    Fertilizer prices are high, but proper fertilization of forages can still provide less expensive feed than the alternatives. If we eliminate the "watch 'em starve" option, we're left with two possibilities, feed or sell. I'll leave it to the economists to tell you if you should keep them or sell them. I will discuss whether using nitrogen fertilizer to "feed 'em" is a good alternative.

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    Survey Finds Americans 'Don't Get' Energy Iss

    Energy policy is a political hot potato, oil prices are on a rollercoaster ride of unpredictability and gasoline is at an all-time high of just under (and in many places more than) $3 per gallon. Yet, a new survey finds that most Americans don't understand key energy issues.

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    An Introduction to Factory Farming

    Wikipedia states that "Factory farming is a term used to describe a set of controversial practices in large-scale, intensive agriculture, usually referring to the industrialized production of livestock, poultry, and fish. The methods deployed are geared toward making use of economies of scale to produce the highest output at the lowest cost." At first glance, one can't help but notice a few interesting terms in this definition, like "controversial practices", "intensive agriculture", and ...

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    Genetically Modified Maize Vaccine Can Aid

    In many developing nations around the world, small-scale farmers often rely upon poultry farming solely for their livelihood. Unfortunately, for many of these farmers, this livelihood has been affected by the Newcastle Disease Virus (NDV), a contagious and fatal viral disease that infects a wide range of both domestic and wild birds, including chickens. NDV also has a devastating effect on commercial poultry production.

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    Ethanol, Fertilizer & Higher Natural Gas Pric

    What does growing corn and other crops have anything to do with natural gas? It takes about 33,000 cubic feet of natural gas to produce one ton of nitrogen fertilizer. About 96 percent of the corn planted in the United States depends on fertilizers, such as Anhydrous Ammonia (NH3), 28pct-Liquid Nitrogen, Urea and Ammonium Sulfate. Fertilizers consume more than three percent of total U.S. natural gas use. The ethanol boom could dramatically impact natural gas prices.

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    Studies Dispel Myth Of Cancer, Red Meat

    Recent studies published in the journal Cancer Science have disproved the common myth that consumption of red meat increases colorectal cancer risk. Published by the world's largest society publisher Wiley-Blackwell, the study also found that consumption of fish and fish products was similarly inversely related to the risk.

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    New Safety Coalition Formed

    USA Shooting, announced today that Child Guard, LLC will serve as an official Supporting Partner of USA Shooting to provide technical expertise, financial assistance and products in support of USA Shooting teams through 2008.

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    How To Deal With Environmental Stress

    An increasing problem in today's world is environmental stress. This is a type of stress caused by increasing pollution in air we breathe, the water we drink, and even in the sounds we hear. Though environmental stress seems to be simply a physical problem, it can actually alter the ways that our minds work. However, too much environmental stress can also cause physical problems that will ruin our health and lower life expectancy.

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    Economic Boost May be Fueled by Agriculture

    Biofuels are the sustainable fuel for agriculture, said Dr. Sergio Capareda, Texas Agriculture Experiment Station engineer in College Station. "We can certainly expect more biofuel activities in the future," Capareda said. New players, both big and small, as well as new markets, including the marine, trucking and heating industries, will be involved, he said.

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    Landowners Reminded Licenses Needed

    The Texas Parks and Wildlife Department would like to remind landowners that a hunting lease license is required for certain hunting operations, and that such lease licenses must be renewed each year. The owner of a hunting lease or the landowner’s agent may not receive pay or anything of value from hunters unless the owner or agent has acquired a hunting lease license from the department.

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    NDSU Offers Tips to Beat High Fertilizer Prices

    The efficient use of fertilizer and soil testing are two methods to keep fertilizer bills as low as possible, says a North Dakota State University soil science specialist. The key is holding down costs without hurting yields, says Dave Franzen of the NDSU Extension Service.

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