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    Tracking Movement of Cattle with Satellites

    When you buy a new car, the salesperson will not only ask if you want a compact disc player and moon roof, but may also ask if you want On Star or a similar product. These special features use Global Positioning Systems (GPS) technology to track your car anywhere in the world and can give you directions if you are lost.

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    NCBA’s Persistence Scores Major Victories on

    There is probably no issue in the beef industry that gives cattlemen more emotional highs and lows than international trade. We know the potential upside of trade is gigantic, with 96 percent of the world’s consumers living outside the United States. This includes a rapidly growing middle class that craves high-quality beef.

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    Training Mythunderstandings: Horse Logic

    Training horses starts with understanding how their minds work. You have to understand what is logical to the horse. The horse's mind does not work the same way as yours. They do not associate events or a sequence of actions in the same way we reason that things are related. To train a horse, therefore, you have to understand how horse logic works and base your training on that.

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    American Ranch Horse Association Show

    The American Ranch Horse Association World Show Committee recently met and approved more developments for the show coming to Murfreesboro June 23rd through the 28th of 2008. “One word keeps coming in mind for this show- ‘wow’.” reported show chairman Brandon Sutton. “We are making every effort to ‘wow’ those that come to the show, whether they are exhibitors, spectators or vendors

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    National 4-H Headquarters Announces

    Two New Programs of Distinction Jennifer Martin, CSREES Staff, (202) 720-8188 February 14, 2008 National 4-H Headquarters awarded the title of Program of Distinction to two technology-related 4-H programs that reflect the high quality of 4-H youth development programs occurring in communities across the United States.

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    Looking to Buy a Horse: 10 Things to Do First

    Top 10 Things to do BEFORE you go horse shopping. Buying a horse is a big commitment in both time and money. The emotional energy spent is a large factor as well. With so many horses for sale, how do you choose? If you buy a horse before you lay the correct groundwork, you run the risk of coming home with one that isn't suitable for you. At the worst, he could be dangerous and at best, you could easily spend a thousand dollars or more to get professional trainer to correct the problems.

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    Horse Breeds - Thoroughbreds

    Thoroughbreds are known as "America's Racing Horse". This breed of horse runs at the race track every single day around the world. History of the Thoroughbred: This breed of horse was originally bred in England due to the English horsemen's desire to have a fast race horse. There are three that founded this bloodline which are: Byerley Turk, Darley Arabian and Godolphin Arabian, named after their respective owners, Thomas Darley, Lord Godolphin and Captain Robert Byerley.

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    Horse Colic

    Colic is one of the most common horse conditions in which you will need to call your Veterinarian. Colic is not a disease; it is a clinical sign of many possible diseases. Increasing your knowledge of this common condition of horses could save your horse's life. Colic means literally a pain in the abdomen. When a horse "colics," this means that the horse is acting painful, and it appears that the pain is coming from the abdomen. Horse colic can vary greatly in severity.

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    Buying a Horse: What You Must Know Before You

    Introducing a horse to a new environment can be stressful for you and your horse. Here are some steps to take to reduce the stress on both of you. Have Your Horse's Pen or Paddock Ready Have your horse's pen or paddock ready and waiting. If your horse will have a stall, provide fresh shavings if possible. Welcome your horse home with fresh hay and water as well. The more comfortable and welcome you can make your horse, the smoother the transition will be for your new addition.

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    Buying a Horse: What Age Horse is Right For

    With age comes experience, patience, and understanding. Three qualities any horse owner wants in a horse. Have you given any thought to what age horse is right for you? The age of a horse is a part of horse ownership that is sometimes misunderstood. Many people feel that older horses are washed up and ready for the pasture. That could not be further from the truth in many cases. There are pros and cons to young horses as well as horses in their late teens and early twenties.

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    Tidbits of Information About The Horse

    The horse is one of the most beloved of all animals and has a long history of partnership with humans. Here are some little known horse tidbits of information. Any discussion of interesting horse tidbits needs to start about 50 million years ago with a tiny ancestor of the modern horse called eohippus. This tiny precursor to the horse was about the size of a fox and had 4 padded toes on its front feet and three padded toes on its back feet. The word “eo” means dawn and “hippus” means horse.

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    Things To Consider When Stabling Your Horse

    How to stable your horse is an important topic to consider, as well as where to stable your horse. You could consider keeping your horse at home provided you have enough land. You could stable your horse at a friends place or in a livery yard. Any horse that is stabled for long periods is bound to develop a vice unless preventative measures are taken. A stable vice is developed from boredom.

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    Horse Health And Stabling

    When looking for stabling what is important to consider is the actual structure and environment of the stable. The best way to choose a stable for your horse is to know some basic facts and then to actually visit stable in your area to get a comparison. There are basic items that every stable horse should have. When visiting a yard keep these items in mind to ensure that your horse will be well cared for. A neglected stable horse can result in a costly veterinarian bill.

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    How to Photograph your Horse

    A good photograph portrays your horse in his best possible light. A bad photograph, by contrast, draws attention to every fault, no matter how insignificant, and sometimes even exaggerates those faults! Whether you are advertising your horse because he is for sale or advertising his recent show ring accomplishments, knowing how to photograph your horse correctly is a skill you must develop.

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    USDA Announces Sign-Up Dates

    WASHINGTON, Aug. 24, 2007 - The U.S. Department of Agriculture today announced sign-up dates for the new Livestock Compensation Program, Livestock Indemnity Program and Crop Disaster Program. The three ad hoc disaster programs provide benefits to farmers and ranchers who suffered losses caused by natural disasters in recent years.

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    Poultry Biosecurity

    BIOSECURITY is practiced in the commercial poultry industry, and it simply means to keep your facilities as free from contaminants as possible. Viruses, bacteria, parasites, and fungi, can be kept to a minimum and sometimes be eliminated through the practice of biosecurity. I practice biosecurity in my own coop (much to the dismay of my friends).

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    Is It Time to Buy More Cows?

    The abundance of forage, mild temperatures and strong cattle prices have many cow-calf producers wondering if it is time to increase their cow herd numbers. Historically, cow-calf producers have added or liquidated cows based mostly on the price of calves. Weather conditions can sometimes disrupt normal production decisions, but cattlemen have increased and decreased cow numbers fairly consistently over time, and a distinct "cattle cycle" has developed - actually two cycles.

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    Bloat

    Bloat can be a problem in cattle grazing high quality grasses and legumes. Bloat problems will vary with species of animals and among individuals of the same species. Sheep and goats can be affected by bloat but are considered less susceptible. Bloat is caused by the formation of a stable froth in the rumen of susceptible animals, preventing the normal belching of rumen gasses. The resulting accumulation of excess gas in the rumen produces pressure on the lungs and can eventually restrict breathing to the point of causing death by suffocation. Bloat is characterized by a gradual swelling of the left side of the animal. Bloat is apparent within 20 minutes to an hour after the onset of gas retention. If the condition is mild, normal movement of the animal will again allow the normal release of excess gas and the condition diminishes. If the gas buildup continues, the animal will collapse and die from suffocation within a relative short time. Immediate treatment is necessary.

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    Bigger Buck for Your Bang

    Conversations around deer camp inevitably get around to management practices designed to increase the antler size of white-tailed bucks. Discussion usually includes the latest clover seed guaranteed to do everything except produce fawns, minerals that will draw bucks from miles away, and feeders that are activated only by deer scent. How often do you hear a discussion of buck age structure, though? Not often, primarily because no one can sell it to you. Millions of dollars are spent on advertising food plot seeds, minerals, supplemental feed rations, feeders, and–more recently–genetics. Because time is not a marketable item, it is rarely promoted.

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    An Ounce of Prevention May Lead to More Pound

    With the current price of replacement cattle, we must maximize the number of heifers that become productive cows. I am making the big assumption that at this stage in the game everything has gone right (the heifers weighed at least 65 percent of mature weight at breeding, they were bred to proven low-birth-weight bulls, they were culled on poor structure and small pelvic area, they were provided with adequate nutrition up to this point, etc.). But your job as a manager and caretaker of these heifers is still far from done. Heifer performance from this point forward will be determined by how well the heifer is managed up to and after the time she has her first calf.

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    All About Antlers

    Antlers. For some folks-they are the stuff that dreams are made of. To many hunters, harvesting a large antlered buck represents the ultimate accomplishment. However, many people hunt their entire lives without getting the opportunity to realize this goal. Why is this so? To answer this question, let's look at what it takes for a deer to grow a set of large antlers. Three things contribute to antler size – nutrition, genetics, and age. Nutrition is certainly a key ingredient. Adequate year-round nutrition is necessary for a deer to reach its antler producing potential. Spring and summer nutrition are especially important because most antler development actually takes place April-September. Poor forage conditions during this period can take its toll on antler growth. Sound habitat management and deer population management can facilitate good nutritional conditions.

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    A Bunch of Bull

    Many of our cooperators are cow-calf producers. A common thread among cow-calf producers is that they need bulls. This may be the most critical decision made by cow/calf producers. How do you make this decision? I'll share with you some of the steps I use when making the bull purchase decision. Step 1. Decide what kind of bull is needed! Study your situation and decide what kind of bull you need to complement your cows and improve your calf crop. Many producers have better cows than they do bulls. Bulls should be used to improve your calf crop. If you have cows that give a lot of milk but lack muscle and growth, you probably need a bull that is strong in these traits.

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    Preparing for Animal Emergencies

    With spring in full swing, people's thoughts are turning to outdoor activities. If you are like me, you might be thinking about spring cattle working, long overdue fence fixing, trail rides and equine competitions of every type. It is a good idea to also be thinking about putting together a basic first aid kit for animals and keeping it in an easily accessible location in case it becomes necessary. First aid kits can be purchased at some farm supply stores and equine tack shops, but they are very limited as to what supplies are in them and typically very pricey. Assembling a good first aid kit in advance of a situation can be the difference between a minor or major emergency. It really doesn't matter if you are designing a kit for horses or cattle – the basics are still the same. In Table 1, you will see a list of the minimum basics you should have in an easy-to-carry box.

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    How to Groom a Horse and Why

    Grooming a horse safely and correctly is a very important part of daily horse care. It is a great time to check over the horse for any issues on his skin, back, and girth area and to get an idea of how the horse is feeling that day. You should groom a horse before you take it out for riding or exercising. It helps keep them healthy and looking good. First, halter and tie the horse to a ring or safety string attached to something solid. If the horse pulls back, you don't want the horse's halter tied to something that will swing or be pulled out of the ground. A ring on a wall meant for tying or a solid fence post often works well. You can also use cross-ties if you have two rings and cross-ties.

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    A Little Preparation Goes a Long Way in Buyin

    Presently, I have close to 25 sale catalogs on my desk displaying bull offerings coming up this spring. Every one of these bulls is "good" and will help someone, or else they wouldn't have made it into the sale. The question is, how do you pick the one(s) that will help you? It's simple (or at least simpler than most folks realize) when you implement a plan of action before going to a sale and making a purchase. Here are some general rules to follow, broken into three phases, which might help with your next bull purchase.

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    Trees and Plants Can be Dangerous to Your Hor

    When clearing ground for an equestrian facility site in a wooded area, or when horses are allowed to graze in a wooded area, care must be taken to eliminate poisonous plants that are harmful to the residing horses. While horses tend to avoid toxic plants because of their taste, they can still be affected by foraging, particularly if in sparse areas or in times of drought. Cornell University lists the following species of plants that are of particular concern to horse owners: Red Maple, Fiddleneck, Locoweed, Yellow Star Thistle, Crown Vetch, Jimsonweed, Horsetail, Buckwheat, St. John's Wort, Mountain Laurel, Sensitive Fern, Black Cherry, Bitter Cherry, Choke Cherry, Pin Cherry, Bracken, Fern Oaks, Rhubarb, Rhododendron, Castor Bean, Black Locust, Grounsels, Common Nightshade, Black Nightshade, Horse Nettle, Buffalo Bur, Potato Sorghum or Milo, Sudan Grass, Johnson Grass and Yew, as well as molds of various kinds in various feeds

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    Horse Training: Train A Horse For Tomorrow

    Ever hear something and you thought to yourself, "Now that's profound!" The statement was "Always train for tomorrow!" I've heard it said many a time but for some reason it really hit me. Sometimes that happens. You can hear something over and over but there's that one day when it makes a big impact.

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    Horse And Rider Safety

    There is no beating around the bush - horse riding is a risky sport. Apart from the obvious dangers of falling off when mounted, these large animals have always got to be treated with respect when handling them on the ground and in the stable. Riding need not be any more dangerous than any other risk sport, as long as certain precautions such as those listed on this page are followed. Horse Rider Safety should always be borne in mind when riding or near horses. Safety for Visitors on the Yard

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    Choosing the Right Horse Trailer

    Purchasing a horse trailer is an expensive investment, and before you buy you should ensure that you know exactly what you need. As with any large purchase, it's extremely important to do some research before you spend your money. The information below is designed to help you choose the right horse trailer for your needs. Regardless of what you're looking for, these tips will help you find it more quickly and feel more confident that you're making a smart purchase.

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    A Practical Guide to Using Horseshoe Studs

    Studs, Caulks or Calks are metal devices that are screwed or driven into the bottom of your horse's shoes. By protruding from the bottom of the shoe, they can help to provide traction over muddy or deep footing, such as sand, and help your horse jump more confidently. Before using studs, holes are "tapped," or drilled, into both heels, and sometimes the toes, of the horse's shoe. Obviously the size of the hole must accommodate the stud and generally in the US, farriers will tap a hole that supports a 3/8" diameter stud. Therefore, unless you have a special requirement for a smaller hole, such as a pony with very small feet, you should try to stick with 3/8' studs.

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    Individual Actions Can Help Protect Declining

    Local habitat destruction and broad environmental policies are taking a serious toll close to home. Populations of some of America's most familiar and beloved birds have declined over the past 40 years, with some down by as much as 80 percent, according to the National Audubon Society.

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    Give Your Horse Some Slack

    Many people have problems training their horse to stand still. This is usually because many people are constantly messing with their horse to make them stand still. The funny thing about the horse is that he is kind of like a little kid. If you want him to stand still and you tell him to stand still, he is just going to squirm all over the place. This is because he feels like he has to test you on whether or not he can move. If you have children, this may sound very familiar.

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    Horse Breeds - American Quarter Horse

    The American Quarter Horse is the first breed of horse native to the United States. The breed evolved when the bloodlines of horses brought to the New World were mixed. Foundation American Quarter Horse stock originated from Arab, Turk and Barb breeds. Selected Stallions and Mares were crossed with horses brought to Colonial America from England and Ireland in the 1600's.

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    Understanding The Health Of Your Horse

    Your horses health can be affected by lack of shelter and clean water. Horses living in fields are subject to hot sun, pouring rain and flies. Horses with no access to water can become dehydrated and die. Drainage ditches and stagnant ponds are not a suitable source of water for your horse. A shelter acts as a windbreak and a dry place to escape from flies.

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    Your Guide To Goat Farming

    The goats produce two very important products in goat farming - the milk and the meat. In most of the large goat farms the goats are treated much like dairy cows as their accommodations are indoors and they are milked twice a day. Large farmers have more than 400-500 goats in their farms.

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    Equine Colic - Would You Know What To Do?

    "I think your horse has colic." Words to strike fear into any horse owner's heart. But what is colic? What signs should you look for? Colic refers to pain originating in the abdomen. Generally horses do not tolerate abdominal pain very well. So if there is any disturbance of gut function they tend to show signs of pain.

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    Picking Up A Horse's Hoof

    The idea of picking up a horse's hooves can intimidate some owners since a well-placed horse kick would really hurt! Such caution is good, but in reality if you pick up a horse's hoof properly you provide him with no leverage or ability to kick you. This is a situation where a person's worst fears can cause him to imagine an incident that is highly unlikely to occur with careful handling.

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    The TOP 7 Mistakes Horse Owners Make

    Let’s face it. Horses need to be understood for a horse owner to be successful with his horse. The best thing novice horse owners can do is learn how to ride, learn how horses think, learn what works good to shape horses’ behavior, and understand that constantly riding a horse is just about the best thing you can do to have a good horse.

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    Do You Make These Mistakes Loading Your Horse

    Mistake #1: "Here, Kitty Kitty..." Unless they have been educated, new horse owners often think a horse is like a cat or dog. They figure if they tap their thighs and say, "C'mon,...C'mon,...C'mon..." the horse'll will simply jump right in the trailer like a happy dog or cat.

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    The Top 3 Tricks Horse Owners Can Use To

    It’s been weeks since you went riding. Now you have time to ride this afternoon and there ain’t no one gonna stop you. Excited, you saddle up your horse and get on him. You get about 50 feet from the barn and your horse turns around and goes back – and you can’t stop him. Why? You have a barn spoiled horse. This is a common scenario for novice horse owners. Here are the top three tricks to solve the barn sour problem.

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    Horse Training Voice Commands

    To the uninitiated, voice commands for the horse are nothing more than words. But to the horse they are only sounds. Obviously, horses cannot speak our language. Since they cannot speak our language we should think through what we say to them when we want certain responses from them. Take the word "whoa" for instance. I have no doubt this is the most abused word in the human/horse language. When the rider says "whoa" then the horse should know to stop.

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    Horse Training: Who's Way Is The Right Way?

    The more I listen to others, read books on the subject, look at different articles, and watch and listen to tapes, the more I discover how different people claim their methods of horse training are the correct ones. I often find one trainer will adamantly oppose a technique where another will adamantly swear by its effectiveness. Even more interesting, each has his or her own reasons why. On one hand, I find it fascinating that trainers think their way is truly the correct way.

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    Why Difficulties In Horse Training A Good Thi

    I'll never forget one of the first horses I trained by myself. I could not have picked a better horse to give me problems. This horse was slow to motivate. He was very much his own "person" so to speak and was going to do what he pleased...at least...that's how it seemed. There are plenty of horses in this world that will move when you want them to move. In fact, some horses can be so nervous it takes little effort to get them moving in the round pen. In a way, they almost train themselves.

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    Horse Training 101

    Each horse is different in how it learns and how it reacts to outside stimuli. Certain methods of horse training may apply to some horses, but it does not mean that it will be effective to all breeds of horse. To start horse training you must develop a communication system with the horse. This might take time. In the same way as children may not fully grasp the idea of things at an instant, baby horses in training may not get every pressure, pat or way of holding the reins at once.

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    How To Find The Best Horse For Your Child

    Owning a horse is a huge responsibility for an adult, much less for a child. Owning a horse requires a lot of time and money, both from the parent and the child, therefore, before you decide to go horse-shopping, it’s best that you sit down and discuss the responsibilities and tasks involved in owning and caring for a horse with the child. A horse, remind them, is not a mere domestic pet. It’s unlike a cat, dog or hamster. Horses require more than that.

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    How to Provide First Aid For Your Horse

    If your horse is in the field, and it suffers a severe cut, you will want to stop the bleeding as soon as possible. You will need to make a call to your vet, and there are steps you also need to take in order to provide first aid to your horse as soon as possible. You will want to stabilize the horse prior to the arrival of the vet.

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    Getting The Right Saddle For Your Horse

    Ensuring that you select the right saddle for your horse is vital. It not only affects the position in which the rider will sit, and therefore can be beneficial in preventing back ache or muscle pain, but it also affects the horse. No responsible horse owner would want their steed to be in discomfort and pain and so choosing the best saddle is very important.

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    Horse Training: Did Your Horse Spill The Pain

    One I like to harp on is the prin- ciple of "kindness." Instinctively, most understand the kindness thing. After all, why be cruel to your horse. Even though that's a given, that's not the principle reason I preach about being kind to your horse. When I say "treat your horse with kindness" the importance in training is this: When a horse does as you ask, he should be rewarded with kindness such as a carress on the point of shoulder or forehead.

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    Horse Training: Calm Your Horse With Sing Son

    First, the tone of voice is important. After all, if you said this in a threatening tone of voice it wouldn't calm him. Thus, the pleasant, gentle, calm voice is one of the keys. Secondly, animals cannot speak a human language although they know certain words mean certain things once they're trained to it. Plus, when the horse hears "There's a clever boy...." it has no meaning in the sense that you want him to do something...although later on it will have a meaning of "calm down,...

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    Horse Training: Teach Your Horse To Use His H

    Wanna help your horse develop and use his hindquarters more? Ride him up and down steep hills. Before you do though, I suggest you have control over him. Thus, when you ask him to stop, he knows to stop. And be sure to do it in places where you feel safest. Don't be around a bunch of wire fencing, posts, holes, etc. Now as you go up the hill, pick a point you want to go to. Walk slowly, straight, and don't let him get chargey.

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    Horse Training: Prevention and Cure

    If you own a horse that has a bad habit like biting, kicking, shying, bolting, halter pulling, etc. - it's a good idea to look at how that happened. That's an important horse training principle if you're going to be a horse trainer and learn to train a horse. Often, horse owners allow it to happen because, frankly, they honestly didn't know any better.

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    Horse Training: What Rearing Really Is

    Have you ever tried to get your horse to go somewhere (like through a door or in a trailer) and he rears as he approaches? In this case, the rearing is a symptom of a problem. The horse is showing resistance and fear - plus a lack of respect for the handler's direction. To solve this, you must do groundwork away from the spooky object. You'll want to do exercises that will get him to expand his comfort level AND get his feet moving forward.

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    Horse Training: Does Your Horse Have The Feel

    There's an old horse training saying. It says "your horse should have the feel." Basically, that means if you're leading your horse with the lead rope, does he follow you with virtually no tugging on that lead rope? As part of the breaking process a horse is taught to lead. That's a natural part of how to train a horse when you're a horse trainer. when he does, the goal is to have him step in sync (and stop) with you. When you step, the lead rope has almost no "pull" on it.

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    How To Choose Or Buy A Horse

    The following simple rules will be found useful to all parties about to buy a horse: I. Never take the seller's word; if dishonest he will be sure to cheat you, if disposed to be fair, he may have been the dupe of another, and will deceive you through representations which cannot be relied upon. II. If you trust the horse's mouth for his age, observe well the rules given below, for that purpose.

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    10 Ways Horses Build Character in Children

    I hope the information provided here will help you realize how important it is for you to find a creative yet fulfilling way for you to teach your child all aspects of owning and caring for a horse.

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    Tips In Getting Your Horse To Trust You

    It is far more enjoyable to ride a horse that trusts you rather than one who does not. But getting a horse to trust you is a difficult task, especially if the horse has a history of past abuse.

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    Break In Or Educate Your Horse

    When you hear someone say they are breaking-in a horse what comes to mind? Do you think of cowboys bucking a horse around a yard until it stops? If you hear someone say they are educating their horse what comes to mind? Do you think of someone working quietly with a horse?

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    Basic Training of a Young Horse

    When it comes to understanding your horse, some simple common sense can take you quite a long distance when it comes to knowing if he or she is ready to work with you on some basic horse training. Actually, understanding whether your horse is in a receptive mood to easily learn what you want to teach him is much like understanding yourself when it comes to learning something new.

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    What Color Is A Horse?

    What color is a horse? The words for a horse’s coat color have very specific meanings. A bay horse has a body coat that is a shade of brown with black legs, mane, and tail. Within the bay group, there are blood bays which is a more dark reddish shade of brown and bright bays which can look a golden brown. There are also black bays, which might appear to most people as a black horse. Truly black horses are a more rare color.

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    How to Groom a Horse and Why

    Grooming a horse safely and correctly is a very important part of daily horse care. It is a great time to check over the horse for any issues on his skin, back, and girth area and to get an idea of how the horse is feeling that day. You should groom a horse before you take it out for riding or exercising. It helps keep them healthy and looking good.

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    Eliminating Skunk Odor From Your Dog

    A skunk’s spray is one of the most unpleasant odors there is to a human’s nose. Putting your dog outside in the yard, hearing a commotion and finding out a skunk has sprayed your pet is not only terrible but also very smelly. A skunk’s spray is yellowy oil, which they spray or mist from up to almost twenty feet away when they feel like they are in danger. Many dogs end up sprayed because they try to defend their property and the skunk usually wins.

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    Skin Conditions and Homeopathy

    Homeopathic remedies can be very helpful in treating animals with skin conditions, from injuries to allergies. The way homeopathy works is "like cures like" and its success depends on a careful matching of the remedy to the patient's characteristic symptoms as well as the disease symptoms. Homeopathy is not "this remedy for this" and "that remedy for that" but certain remedies do have affinities for certain conditions based on the typical or unique symptoms.

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    Calming Aromatherapy for Fear and Anxiety

    One of the most unsettling experiences to deal with when you are handling your horse is an attack of fear or anxiety. Once the incident takes shape of its own then your own emotions come into play and continue the spiral of energy that leads you and your horse down an unpleasant path.

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    Using Natural Supplements for Performance Horses

    I feel we should draw a distinction between substances that help restore a horse to its natural physical, mental, and emotional state, and substances that actually increase a horse's performance beyond his normal abilities or mask pain. Since this can be quite confusing, I'll give a couple of examples.

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    To Rescue a Starving Horse

    You are driving to work one morning, sipping your coffee, when you spy what appears to be a sick animal in a lot near the highway. You slow down to get a better view and discover a thin, weak, sorrel horse in a small lot. You can literally count the poor animal's ribs. You stop for an even closer look.

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